My life is a comedy sprinkled with finely grated tragedy.

20th April 2014

Photo

Happy Easter! Sometimes you have to put on a brave face and pretend you’re happy until you believe it.

Happy Easter! Sometimes you have to put on a brave face and pretend you’re happy until you believe it.

14th April 2014

Video reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart with 284 notes

jtotheizzoe:

skunkbear:

A musical reminder of tonight’s full lunar eclipse!

Tonight, for the first time since 2011, folks in North America will get the chance to see a total lunar eclipse.  It’s supposed to start in earnest around 2 AM on the east coast (11 PM west coast).

Unfortunately I think clouds will spoil the fun for me (and most people on the east coast). But I woke with this song stuck in my head and ended up recording it before I headed out for work with my phone. (My sincerest apologies to Bonnie Tyler)

You can find more detailed information about the eclipse here.

And if you miss it this time, good news: Another blood moon is forecast for October, and again next April.

The eclipse photo I use in the video was taken in 2011 by Fred Espenak (NASA Marshall Space Center).

Related to the last, but in musical form.

Source: skunkbear

9th April 2014

Link reblogged from how do you kill a man with no body with 98 notes

Ultimate Warrior passes away →

nintendofunclub:

100% confirmed now.

Damn.

3rd April 2014

Photo reblogged from & I'll try to get a little better with 2,738 notes

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 
And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  
The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 
The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art. 
Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 

And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  

The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 

The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art.

Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

Source: The Atlantic

3rd April 2014

Photo reblogged from The Atlantic with 2,738 notes

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 
And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  
The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 
The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art. 
Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 

And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  

The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 

The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art.

Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

3rd April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Proof with 339 notes

proofmathisbeautiful:

From Breaking Bad to Lost: The Quality of 13 Famous TV Shows, Charted Over Time

In your heart, you’ve always known that the last season of Dexter totally sucked. Now you have the charts to back it up.

Graph TV,” the latest project by data viz virtuoso Kevin Wu, lets you visualize IMDb’s massive database of user ratings. Type in the name of a show and the site gamely spits out a graph of every episode, helpfully color coding seasons and drawing a linear regression line for each. No longer will your TV arguments be founded solely on vague recollections and long-held grudges. This is cold hard data.

The idea came to Wu when Breaking Bad was finishing up its fifth and final season. “I thought the last half of season five was just amazing, and wondered if people thought the same,” he remembers. It’s clear that his fellow fans agreed–the chart for the series shows a strong upward slope during the second half of that last season.

The Breaking Bad graph has all the markings of a fan favorite. The show had high ratings across the board–no single episode averaged lower than an 8–and a strong upward progression for each season. That last bit might be key to explaining the show’s success. By ending every season stronger than it started, Breaking Bad never left fans disappointed. In other words, while there may have been some clunkers in season three, generally speaking, people never felt like the show was losing steam.

Other graphs tell other stories. In the case of The Office, we see a strong climb in season three, just when the American version was finding its voice–and then a plateauing in seasons four and five, with a downward slide in season six. West Wing fell off after four seasons, when writer Aaron Sorkin left the show. 24 similarly lost steam after its first few seasons, only to come back with a riveting finale. Dexter was just the opposite, plummeting in its final season with a truly polarizing final episode.

Wu says most of the reactions he’s seen suggest that the graphs line up with the general sentiments of the TV watching public. “I thought that the knowledge of the crowds are fairly accurate and represent most people’s feelings,” he says. And that goes not just for seasons but for particular episodes too. The very last dot on the Seinfeld graph reflects what we’ve all long thought–that the finale was kind of a downer. Two dots sitting high above the pack, however, were just as deserved. They’re two stellar, nine-point-fives: “The Contest” and “The Soup Nazi.”

Check out the interactive version here, where you can see how your favorite episodes rate.

27th March 2014

Photo reblogged from Geology Rocks with 41 notes

cmzwml:

"The Missing Link Between Geology and Biology" —A New Theory
Related News
minerals , all-geo , crystals , science , rocks , nature , photography , mineralogy , notes , pettijohn , indonesiangeology , selfie , picoftheday , littlemonster , landscapes , parks , It’s the bigger shit ever , ladygaga , artpopball , I hate geology , applause , instapic , Sheldon Cooper would understand , guy , sandstone , arizona , utah , canyon , paria canyon , coyote buttes , wilderness , the wave , geography , artpop , littlemonster4ever , studying , artrave , happiness , class , prism , geothermal , caledonite , dolomite , chalcopyrite , austria , minerology , pyromorphite , rare , geologist , geologia , archerlibrary , universityofregina , bibliotecaarcher , geologo , uofr , vidadeestudiante , macro , quartz , volcanic , nature baths , lake , beautiful , caldera , planet earth , lovely , iceland , anime , fieldwork , u of s , me me me me me , 2D , art , sedimentology

cmzwml:

"The Missing Link Between Geology and Biology" —A New Theory

Related News

minerals , all-geo , crystals , science , rocks , nature , photography , mineralogy , notes , pettijohn , indonesiangeology , selfie , picoftheday , littlemonster , landscapes , parks , It’s the bigger shit ever , ladygaga , artpopball , I hate geology , applause , instapic , Sheldon Cooper would understand , guy , sandstone , arizona , utah , canyon , paria canyon , coyote buttes , wilderness , the wave , geography , artpop , littlemonster4ever , studying , artrave , happiness , class , prism , geothermal , caledonite , dolomite , chalcopyrite , austria , minerology , pyromorphite , rare , geologist , geologia , archerlibrary , universityofregina , bibliotecaarcher , geologo , uofr , vidadeestudiante , macro , quartz , volcanic , nature baths , lake , beautiful , caldera , planet earth , lovely , iceland , anime , fieldwork , u of s , me me me me me , 2D , art , sedimentology

27th March 2014

Photo reblogged from SI Photo Blog with 127 notes

siphotos:

A young Matt Harvey appears to be waiting for his chance to pitch.  The New York Mets’ pitcher, currently rehabbing from Tommy John surgery, turned 25 today.  (Courtesy of the Harvey Family)
GALLERY: Childhood Photos of Matt Harvey

siphotos:

A young Matt Harvey appears to be waiting for his chance to pitch.  The New York Mets’ pitcher, currently rehabbing from Tommy John surgery, turned 25 today.  (Courtesy of the Harvey Family)

GALLERY: Childhood Photos of Matt Harvey

27th March 2014

Video reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart with 574 notes

jtotheizzoe:

The Firefly Time-Lapse

Wow. This one is simply stunning. A wonderful new time-lapse from Vincent Brady, with music from Brandon McCoy, captures fireflies like Earthbound shooting stars against the backdrop of the night sky that we usually see in videos like these. Using long exposures and stacked images, this time-lapse operates on two scales: Terrestrial and astronomical.

Ahhh, good ol’ Photina pyralis, those harbingers of warmer days, those bearers of chemical candlelight, those blinking lovers calling out for a mate on long summer nights. 

Photina creates its light using a process called chemiluminescence, mediated by an enzyme called luciferase. The luciferase protein, a name which stirs images of fiery spirits, grabs on to its chemical target, a molecule called luciferin, sitting ready, but dark, in the active site of the protein, like an unlit firework. Luciferase then reaches for a molecule of ATP, every living cell’s energy source, luminescent or not, capturing its chemical energy like a sprinkling of gunpowder on a fuse. It breaks apart that ATP into AMP and pyrophosphate, and with the release of that fiery-sounding byproduct, the invocation of fire begins.

Now oxygen gas, the very fuel fire needs to burn, rips away the AMP and sits down in its place. The fuse is burnt, the fire has food, and it’s time to ignite. Exhaling carbon dioxide, the luciferin molecule is excited into oxyluciferin, its atoms charged full via oxidation. Almost instantly, it relaxes back to a resting state, shooting out a photon like a quantum bullet.

Image via wikipedia

And so it happens, millions of times a minute, in invisible pyralis posteriors that only betray their location in fleeting flashes of chemistry as they streak across the twilight sky.

Think about that as you watch this, speakers up, full screen.

24th February 2014

Photoset reblogged from with 511 notes

comedycentral:

mybloodyicecream:

My bid was over, too.

New @midnight, tonight after Colbert!

Source: mybloodyicecream